Earl Spencer: Diana's fame informs work

Britain's Earl Spencer says his late sister Princess Diana's fame helps with his career because he can better understand and "humanise" the people he researches and writes about.

Earl Spencer
Earl Spencer

Britain's Earl Spencer says his late sister Princess Diana's fame helps with his career.

The historian and author believes observing the global recognition his sister - who died in a Paris car crash in 1997 - experienced helps "humanise" the people he researches for his work.

Discussing his new book, 'Killers of the King: The Men Who Dared to Execute Charles I', he said: "When your big sister becomes arguably the most famous woman in the world, you realise the absurdity of fame. It really helps as a historian. They're still human beings.

"One of the most moving passages in this book is the king, knowing he's going to be executed the next day, saying goodbye to his eight-year-old son and 13-year-old daughter. In that scene, he's no longer a king."

Charles previously worked on the 'Today' show as a correspondent from 1986 to 1995 and says his sister was able to reduce network executives "to jelly" with her presence.

Recalling a time Diana visited him at the NBC London bureau, he told the Wall Street Journal: "[It was] at the peak of her global fame to take me out to lunch. All these hardened NBC hacks were reduced to jelly."

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