Hulk Hogan learned to 'save' his 'damn money'

Hulk Hogan says the best advice he's ever received during his illustrious wrestling and entertainment career is to "save your damn money".

Hulk Hogan learned to 'save' his 'damn money'

Hulk Hogan says the best advice he's been given in his career is to "save your damn money".

The WWE legend admits earning your living in the wrestling business can be a perilous thing and although he was at the top of the grappling world for two decades he was told early on to look after his cash.

When asked what are the three business lessons he has learned throughout his career, he said: "Save your money, save your money and save your damn money."

At the age of 61, Hogan is still a regular on World Wrestling Entertainment TV show 'RAW' and will be a judge on upcoming reality show 'Tough Enough', on which he will be tasked with finding a new wrestler for the company.

The Hall of Fame inductee - who has also enjoyed a successful acting career and starred in TV show 'Hogan Knows Best' - is amazed he is still involved in wrestling but admits it was hard for him when he had to stop competing in the ring and try and make money using his "brand".

Hogan lost a reputed 70 percent of his amassed fortune when he divorced ex-wife Linda Hogan - with whom he has grown-up children, Brooke and Nick - in 2008 and he to reinvent himself to keep earning.

The multi-time world champion - who is now married to Jennifer McDaniel - told the Orlando Business Journal: "My biggest accomplishment is staying relevant for 35 years ... I had a really great run and had to stay relevant. I changed characters a few times and did reality TV and a bunch of different TV series. I never dreamed at 61 years young that I would still be here ... Making the transition from actually wrestling to trying to figure out how to generate revenue without physically getting in the ring (was a challenge). I had to figure out how to use my brand and exploit the 35 years of goodwill with the world and turn that into a money making machine. Once you wrestle main events for 30 years and all of a sudden it's taken away from you because physically you can't do it, reality sets in and you have to figure out how to reinvent yourself. I made that transition out of survival. I went through a crazy divorce, I had a huge $60 million civil suite from an accident and my body shut down on me for two years - I had nine back surgeries. I had to figure out how to take the brand, make it work and do stuff I wasn't used to doing such as open other businesses and other ventures."

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